Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

Self Portrait of Giambattista Tiepolo (1752–53), detail from the Residenz Würzburg ceiling frescoes in Würzburg, Germany, Tiepolo, Italy, Italy (Photo courtesy of the Residenz Würzburg)
Self Portrait of Giambattista Tiepolo (1752–53), detail from the Residenz Würzburg ceiling frescoes in Würzburg, Germany

By a long shot the best Italian rococo painter

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (1696-1770)—a.k.a. Giambattista Tiepolo—was the best Rococo artist there was, influenced by his Venetian Late Renaissance predecessors but also the Roman and Neapolitan Baroque.

His specialty was painting ceiling frescoes (and canvases meant to be placed in a ceiling) that opened up the space into frothy, cloud-filled Heavens of light, angels, and pale, sun-risey colors.

Though he painted many works for Veneto villas in his native Italy, he also spent much of his time traveling throughout Europe on long commissions (his work in Würzburg, Germany enjoys distinction as the largest ceiling fresco in the world).

His son Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (1727–1804) carried on the family tradition.

Selected works by Tiepolo in Italy


The Presentation of Christ in the Temple (1574) by Giandomenico Tiepolo in the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, Milan

"Abraham Praying before the Three Angels" (1730) by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo in the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, Venice

Allegory of Virtue and Nobility (1740–50) by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan

Comunione of Santa Lucia (1748) by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo in the Castello Sforzesco, Milan

"The Triumph of Zephyr and Flora" (1734–35) by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo in the Ca' Rezzonico, Venice

"Sacred Family" or "Sacra Famiglia" (1749) by Giandomenico Tiepolo in the Ca' Rezzonico, Venice

"The scourge of Snakes" or "Castigo dei serpenti" (1732–35) by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo in the Accademia Galleries, Venice

Il Naufragio di San Satiro (The Shipwreck of St. Satiro) (1737) by Giambattista Tiepolo in the Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio, Milan

Where to find works by Tiepolo in Italy

★★★
"The Birth of Venus" (1484–85) by Sandro Botticelli (Photo Public Domain)
Uffizi
Florence: Centro Storico

Visiting the Gallerie degli Uffizi is like taking Renaissance 101: A smorgasbord of paintings by Giotto, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Raphael, Titian, and Botticelli—including his iconic "Birth of Venus"

 
★★★
Niobids (Photo by Михаил Бернгардт)
Uffizi 3rd floor 2nd corridor
Florence: Centro Storico

Visiting the Gallerie degli Uffizi is like taking Renaissance 101: A smorgasbord of paintings by Giotto, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Raphael, Titian, and Botticelli—including his iconic "Birth of Venus"

 
★★★
St. Mark Preaching in Alexandria (1504–07) by Gentile and Giovanni Bellini in Room 8 (Photo by SunOfErat)

Milan's Brera is one of the top painting galleries in Northern Italy, with works by Raphael, Caravaggio, Tintoretto, Mantegna, Bellini, and Piero della Francesca

 
★★☆
The castle as seen from the air (Photo by Zheng Yan)
Castello Sforzesco
Milan: Castello / Sempione

Milan's sprawling 15C castle is home to several excellent museums, of tapestries, archaeological artifacts, paintings by Bellini and Mantegna, and sculptures from medieval to neoclassical—including Michelangelo's final sculpture, the Rondanini Pietà

 
★★★
"Venus of Urbino" (1538) by Titian (Photo Public Domain)
Uffizi 2nd floor
Florence: Centro Storico

Visiting the Gallerie degli Uffizi is like taking Renaissance 101: A smorgasbord of paintings by Giotto, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Raphael, Titian, and Botticelli—including his iconic "Birth of Venus"

 
★★☆
The Pinacoteca and Bilblioteca Ambrosiana (Photo by George M. Groutas)

A formerly private painting gallery and library with Raphael's cartoon for School of Athens and Da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus

 
★★☆
The Upper Hall, or Salone Maggiore (Photo by Didier Descouens)

An ancient Venetian men's club slathered in Tintoretto paintings

 
★☆☆
The Atrium (Photo by Jean-Christophe BENOIST)
Free
Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio
Milan: San Vittore

From this 4C church, St. Ambrose—bishop of Milan when the city was briefly capital of the Western Roman Empire—had a profound effect on the development of the early church

 
★☆☆
The armory, designed by Arnoldo Pomodoro (Photo Public Domain)

A small private museum stuffed with great paintings by Bellini, Botticelli, Piero della Francesca, Tiepolo, and more (plus: a poison ring!)

 
★☆☆
The Grand Canal facade (Photo by Alice Barigelli)
Ca' Rezzonico
Venice: Dorsoduro

This Grand Canal palazzo houses the Museo del '700 Veneziano, or Museum of 18th-Century Venice

 
☆☆☆
Japanese kai (painted shells for playing kai-awase), Edo period (Photo by Sailko)
Ca' Pésaro
Venice: Santa Croce

Venice's Ca' Pésaro and two collections: Galleria Internazionale d'Arte Moderna (Gallery of Modern Art) and Museo d'Arte Orientale (Asian Art Museum)

 
★★☆

A 17C riverside fortress filled with Renaissance and baroque Old Maters—and a striking Palladian theater

 
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Museo di Castelvecchio
Città Antica di Verona

A gorgeous medieval castle now home to paintings by Renaissance masters from Venice and Verona

 
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Desenzano
Southern Lake Garda

The town anchoring Gardsa's SW corner is home to Northern Italy's best-=preserved ancient Roman villa