Uffizi: Primo Piano ★★★

"Venus of Urbino" (1538) by Titian, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Florence, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
"Venus of Urbino" (1538) by Titian

Visiting the Gallerie degli Uffizi is like taking Renaissance 101: A smorgasbord of paintings by Giotto, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Raphael, Titian, and Botticelli—including his iconic "Birth of Venus"

A new staircase leads you down into the Grande Uffizi's expansion of palazzo rooms hung with still more art on the primo piano (second floor).

The Blue Rooms: "Foreign" works of the 16th and 17th centuries (Uffizi Rooms 46–55)

The High Renaissance shades into the baroque as the artistic ideals born in 15th century Florence sweep across Europe, bringing the Renaissance with them.

The rooms are divided mostly along national lines (Spanish, Dutch, Flemish, French) and general eras (late 16C, early 17C, etc.). No real show=stoppers here, but be on the lookout for fine works by Rembrandt ★ (who provided two Self-Portraits, one as a young man one as an elderly one), Diego Velásquez, Francisco Goya, Giuseppe Ribera, El Greco (a Greek who studied in Venice, but since he settled in Toledo he counts as "Spanish"), Jan Steen, Van Dyck, Van Brueughel (mostly the Younger, but also an Elder), Paul Bril, Charles Le Brun, and Simon Vouet.

All of these are fine works, and many would likely be among the centerpieces of other collections. However, this is not other collections, This is the Uffizi, the most embarrassingly masterpiece-laden museum of its size in the world. Most people—especially on a first visit—tend to blow through these northern Renaissance rooms pretty quickly

The Red Rooms I: The Mannerists (Uffizi Rooms 56–61)

Modernism is a state of mind
Proof that all art is 'modern art'...at least in its own time. The High Renaissance offshoot movement we now call "Mannerism" is an abbreviation of how the works by these artists were referred to at the time, as painting done "nella maniera moderna," which means "in the modern manner." Hence, "Mannerism." 

It could have just as easily been called "modernism," but then what would we have called the new styles of art birthed in the late 19th/early 20th century? 

Actually, the irony of terming everything from the Impressionists to Abstract Expressionism "modernism" has led us to use the ridiculous and meaningless phrase "post-modern" to describe art from about 1960 on. Does that mean art now lives in an eternal future state, beyond the modern present? 

But I digress. Also, I broke my promise about no more art history. Sorry.)

Room 56 is a short hall filled with Hellenistic antiquities to give you a breather before plunging into a section of the oft-overlooked artists of the Mannerist era—though you have to figure they won't be overlooked for much longer, given these special rooms dedicated to them (not to mention the fact that the Mannerist era is the special field of study of Antonio Natali, the the Uffizi's director since 2006).

The startling colors and attention to the musculature of twisting bodies that Michelangelo used in ground-breaking works like the Doni Tondo upstairs influenced a whole generation of artists called "Mannerists"—Andrea del Sarto, Rosso Fiorentino, Pontormo, and Parmigianino—whose works fill next few rooms.

You could consider Mannerism an offshoot of the High Renaissance, a particular Michelangelesque style that flourished among a small group of artists for a few generations before petering out. It was concurrent with the more classical (and Classicist) version of the High Renaissance that spread throughout Europe and would eventually develop (degrade?) into the baroque style that would dominate the 17th and early 18th centuries.

Rooms 57–58: Andrea del Sarto (born Andrea di Agnolo) was the most important painter in Florence in the early 16th century, while Michelangelo and Raphael were off working in Rome. His consciously developed mannerist style is evident in his masterful Madonna of the Harpies (1515–17) in Room 58.

Room 59 is delightfully called "Amici di Andrea," filled with works by del Sarto's friends and contemporaries, including Bachiacca and Francabigio. (There is also Pontoromo's Leda; more on him in two rooms.)

Room 60 is devoted to works by one of del Sarto's greatest mannerist students, Giovanni Battista Rossi, called Rosso Fiorentino. Fiorentino's Moses Defends the Daughters of Jethro (1523) ★ owes much to Michelangelesque nudes but is also wholly original in the use of harsh lighting that reduces the figures to basics shapes of color. It is a shockingly modern work, in some presaging Cézanne and other Impressionists of the late 19th century.

Also check out his Pala dello Spedalingo di Santa Maria Nuova, a "Madonna Enthroned" surrounded by saints John the Baptist, Anthony Abbot, "Stephen," and Jerome. This was commissioned for the church of Ognissanti, but when they saw it they rejected the piece for the ugly leers on the saints—especially the "diabolical face" of the gaunt St. Jerome on the far right—though they can't have been too happy with the heavy Goth eye makeup on the Baby Jesus and Virgin Mary, either. Instead, the altarpiece ended up in a provincial church in the Mugello countryside—but, since the church was dedicated to Santo Stefano, Rosso (or perhaps Ridolfo Ghirlandaio) first added a stone to the head of St. Benedict, second from the right, to turn him into St. Stephen.

Room 61 is dominated by another of del Sarto's star pupils, Jacopo Carrucci, known as Pontormo, including a striking retro-portrait of Cosimo il Vecchio (1519–20), the progenitor of the Medici clan's power (but whom, by the time this was painted, had been dead some 55 years).

Fell free to skip the the treacle and tripe in the two side rooms off the the right, Rooms 62–63, stuffed with substandard examples of 16th century paintings by the likes of Giorgio Vasari, Alessandro Allori, Jacopo Zucchi, L'Empoli, Santi di Tito, and other chaps who grew up in Michelangelo's shadow and desperately wished they could paint like him (note: they couldn't).

The good stuff continues straight ahead in Rooms 64–65, devoted to Pontormo's adopted son, Bronzino who hewed much more closely to the Classical model of the High Renaissance than the intriguingly fraught mannerism of his immediate forbearers. Room 65 is particularly interesting as a collection of Bronzino portraits of various members of the Medici family.

The Red Rooms II: Raphael (Uffizi Room 66)

Now that we've ended the mannerist experiment with Bronzino setting Florentine painting back on the classicism route, we're ready for another show-stopper room dedicated to High Renaissance darling Raffaello di Sanzio.

Of Raphael we have the Madonna of the Goldfinch(1505), a work he painted in a Leonardesque style for a friend's wedding, and several important portraits, including (Medici) Pope Leo X with Cardinals Giulio de' Medici and Luigi de' Rossi and Pope Julius II, as well as a famous and oft-reproduced Self-portrait.

The Red Rooms III: The Late Renaissance (Uffizi Rooms 68–88)

The balance of the "Red Rooms" along this wing of the Uffizi are a grab bag of late Renaissance works, and the room numbering gets a bit hinky, since opening off of them to the right are a series of rooms currently used for temporary exhibitions and therefore only sometimes open.

So, although the room numbers skip around, the permanent collection of the "Red Rooms" continues in a straight line. Here are the highlights.

Room 68 has 16C Roman painting heavily influenced by Michelangelo and Raphael (whose St John the Baptist hangs here), by such artists as Giulio Romano, Daniele da Volterra, and Francesco Salviati, who helped the ideals and look of the Florentine Renaissance flourish in Rome.

Room 71 is home to a passel of Correggio Madonnas.

Room 74 is dominated by late mannerist master Il Parmigianino, who carried the mannerist movement to its logical extremes with the almost grotesquely elongated bodies of the Madonna of the Long Neck(1534) ★.

Room 75 houses Old Testament scenes by the quirkily poetic painter Giorgione, a student of Giovanni Bellini who helped found the Venetian school of the High Renaissance (along with a young colleague/pupil named Titian) but who died of the plague at the age of 30. The room also has canvases by Sienese High Renaissance painter Sebastiano del Piombo; his Death of Adonis and Portrait of a Woman are both strong works.

Room 83 is a long gallery honoring the great Venetian Titian, nearly a dozen canvases including the warm, full-bodied Flora ★★ and a poetic Venus of Urbino ★ languishing on her bed.

Room 88 finishes off the hall with modest works by Lombard painters of the 16C like Lorenzo Lotto and Giovan Battista Moroni.

The Verone connecting hall

This hall connecting back to the northern wing of the Uffizi offers another brief break from the wall-to-wall paintings with a view in one direction of the Arno and in the other of the Uffizi's interior court.

You probably just want to stare out the window for a while and forget about all the art, but in case you are curious:

The bronze statues at either end are the Marte gradivo by Bartolomeo Ammannati, in which the war god is exhorting his troops, and a Silenus with the Baby Bacchus by Jacopo del Duca, which he copied from a Roman statue (that at the time belonged to the Medici but is now in the Louvre) which was, itself, supposedly a copy of an ancient bronze original by Lyssipos, one of the greatest sculptors of ancient Greece.

The large Vaso Medici marble vase in the center of the hall was a prize piece of the collection, a neo-Attic piece from the late 2C BC in astoundingly good shape. It is carved with a relief of Achilles consulting the Delphic Oracle before heading off to the Trojan War. (That was a pretty pointless move, considering the oracle was Apollo's oracle and Apollo really had it in for Achilles, eventually going so far as giving Trojan prince Paris the poisoned arrow that would kill the Greek hero and telling Paris to aim at Achilles' heel.)

OK, rested from all the great art? Good, 'cause there's more.

The Gold Rooms: Caravaggio and the Caravaggieschi (Uffizi Rooms 90–100)

The inimitable Caravaggio—born Michelangelo Meresi, but since there was already a rather famous artist named Michelangelo, he was known as Caravaggio after his birthplace—was the greatest baroque painter in Italy.

Caravaggio was famed for his use of chiaroscuro—painting with a combination of extreme harsh light and deep shadows, giving his work particular drama and power. What this man could do with just one elderly saint's wrinkled forehead...The style he popularized was even named after him: Caravaggiesque.

Room 90 of the Uffizi preserves his painting of the severed head of Medusa, a Sacrifice of Isaac, and his famous Bacchus ★★.

Caravaggio's work influenced a generation of artists—the Caravaggieschi—including Artemisia Gentileschi, the only female painter to make a name for herself in the late Renaissance/early baroque. Artemisia was eclipsed in fame by her slightly less talented father, Orazio, and she was the victim and central figure in a sensational rape trial brought against Orazio's onetime collaborator. It evidently had an effect on her professional life; among her paintings here in Room 90 is the violent Judith Slaying Holofernes.

Rooms 91–93 contain more Caravaggiesque works by Bartolomeo Manfredi, Gherardo delle Notti,and others.

Recently opened just behind them are Rooms 95–100, which are all devoted to 17th century Florentine art but—in a bit of a departure for the Uffizi—are mostly arranged by theme and subject rather than school or era.

Rooms 95 and 97 have portraits by Carlo DolciSustermans, and others—interrupted by the "historical scenes" of Room 96—with still lifes in Room 98, and landscapes in Room 99.

They're clearly still trying to figure out these last few rooms, since the Uffizi currently ends—at long last—with rather a whimper, with dull 16C Sienese works by the likes of Rusticchino in Room 100.

Where are the other Uffizi paintings I remember from past visits?

There is a baker half-dozen of rooms beyond Room 100 that are currently not in use, and based on how the Nuove Uffizi has been re-hung so far, I'm betting that these will soon showcase the later Renaissance and baroque canvases that the Uffizi used to hang with pride but which are currently either in storage or out on loan.. (It would also make Room 100's odd foray into the late 16C of Siena make more sense.)

These include works by 16th-century Venetians Giovanni Bellini and Vittore Carpaccio; the dramatic and visible brush strokes that boldly swirled rich, somber colors of several lesser works by Venetian master Tintoretto; some mediocre canvases by Palma il Vecchio; and Paolo Veronese's Martyrdom of St. Justine (1573), which is less about the saint being stabbed than it is a sartorial study in fashion design.

Then there are Rubens' famously ample-bodied nudes; the taffeta, cotton candy oeuvre of baroque weirdo Frederico Barocci (whose works are currently experiencing some of a new vogue–why, I've no idea); and a Greatest Hits role call of 18C Italian artists—Giuseppe Maria Crespi, Giovanni Paolo Pannini, Il Canaletto, Francesco Guardi, and Tiepolo.

Photo gallery
  • "Venus of Urbino" (1538) by Titian, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Madonna delle Arpie" or "Madonna of the Harpies" (1517) by Andrea del Sarto, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Self-Portrait" (1506) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Portrait of Elisabetta Gonzaga" (1504–05) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Saint John the Baptist" (1518) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Portrait of Pope Julius II" (1512) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Pope Leo X with Cardinals Giulio de
  • "Madonna del cardellino" (1506–07) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Portrait of Perugino" (1504–06) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Young Man with an Apple" (1505) by Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio), Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Moses Defending the Daughters of Jethro" (1523-24) by Rosso Fiorentino, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Pietà" (1530) by Bronzino, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Madonna and Child with Young John the Baptist" (1534–36) by Pontormo, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "The Panciatichi Holy Family" (1540) by Bronzino, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Pygmalion and Galatea" (1529-30) by Bronzino, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Supper at Emmaus" (1525) by Pontormo, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Death of Adonis" (1511–12) by Sebastiano del Piombo, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Portrait of Eleonora Gonzaga" (1538) by Titian, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Flora" (1515–17) by Titian, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Venus and Cupid" (1550) by Titian, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Madonna and Child with Angels," known as the "Madonna with the Long Neck" (1534–40) by Parmigianino, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Self-Portrait with a Book" (1585) by Tintoretto, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Portrait of the Sculptor Jacopo Sansovino" (1560–70) by Tintoretto, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Vulcan
  • "Gabrielle d
  • "The Sick Man" (1514) by Titian, Uffizi: Primo Piano, Italy (Photo Public Domain)
  • "Portrait of Cosimo de
TK TK
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Tips

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How long does the Uffizi take?

You can easily spend all day here, but a super-fast visit will take about 2–3 hours.

The ticket office closes at 6:05pm.

They start closing the galleries at 6:35pm.

Book ahead, book ahead, book ahead!

By all means book ahead. In summer, the line can last for two hours—no joke. In winter it's more like 30 minutes—but still, do you want to waste even half an hour? There are two solutions:

  • (1) You'll have less of a wait early in the morning and again around 1:30pm when most people are out having lunch.
  • (2) I highly, highly recommend ponying up the extra €4 to book tickets with a timed entry at tel.+39-055-294-883 or Select Italy.
Save the Uffizi for the afternoon

The Uffizi is open relatively late (it closes at 6:50pm—the ticket office and entrance closes at 6:05pm), and most of Florence's other sights are best seen in the morning, so it's wise to save the Uffizi for an afternoon.

It is also open late in summer (maybe): In some recent summers, the Uffizi has instituted a late-opening schedule, staying open until 9pm on Tuesdays. Let's hope they continue the tradition

"Grande Uffizi" = more art (but it may have moved)

Of the more than 3,100 artworks in the museum's archives, only about 1,700 are on exhibit—though now that the "Grande Uffizi" project has (finally!) expanded the galleries to the first (ground) floor, many more are being put on display.

Put it this way: Since the Uffizi Galleries opened, the only regular display space for its art has been up on the third floor (second piano in Italian). Anyone who visited over the past 75 years or so, that's pretty much what they saw.

In just the past few years, however, the permanent exhibit has expanded to cover a good three-quarters of the second floor (primo piano) as well—and though most of the new rooms are frankly a bit tiny (they weren't originally intended as gallery space), the fact remains that thousands upon thousands of square meters of wall space have opened up to display even more of the Uffiizi's embarrassingly rich collection.

That said, the Grande Uffizi project is not quite finished yet.

Works are constantly being rearranged in order to free up some of the older rooms for their first (desperately needed) refurbishment in roughly 60–70 years.

You'll still get to see them. Just don't expect them necessarily to be in the same place it says on your map or in your guidebook.

Also know before you go that the Uffizi sometimes shuts down rooms for crowd-control reasons—especially in summer, when the bulk of the annual 1.5 million visitors stampedes the place.

Hit the gift shop early

For some reason buried deep in the idiocy of Italian bureaucracy, the museum gift shop actually closes before the museum does (around 6:30pm).

If you'll be staying until closing time and still want a commemorative museum book, postcard, poster, or whatever, pop in before your visit to the galleries or during the middle of your time there (or plan to stop by again on some other day just to visit the gift shop).

How long does the Uffizi take?

You can easily spend all day here, but a super-fast visit will take about 2–3 hours.

The ticket office closes at 6:05pm.

They start closing the galleries at 6:35pm.

Book ahead, book ahead, book ahead!

By all means book ahead. In summer, the line can last for two hours—no joke. In winter it's more like 30 minutes—but still, do you want to waste even half an hour? There are two solutions:

  • (1) You'll have less of a wait early in the morning and again around 1:30pm when most people are out having lunch.
  • (2) I highly, highly recommend ponying up the extra €4 to book tickets with a timed entry at tel.+39-055-294-883 or Select Italy.
Save the Uffizi for the afternoon

The Uffizi is open relatively late (it closes at 6:50pm—the ticket office and entrance closes at 6:05pm), and most of Florence's other sights are best seen in the morning, so it's wise to save the Uffizi for an afternoon.

It is also open late in summer (maybe): In some recent summers, the Uffizi has instituted a late-opening schedule, staying open until 9pm on Tuesdays. Let's hope they continue the tradition

"Grande Uffizi" = more art (but it may have moved)

Of the more than 3,100 artworks in the museum's archives, only about 1,700 are on exhibit—though now that the "Grande Uffizi" project has (finally!) expanded the galleries to the first (ground) floor, many more are being put on display.

Put it this way: Since the Uffizi Galleries opened, the only regular display space for its art has been up on the third floor (second piano in Italian). Anyone who visited over the past 75 years or so, that's pretty much what they saw.

In just the past few years, however, the permanent exhibit has expanded to cover a good three-quarters of the second floor (primo piano) as well—and though most of the new rooms are frankly a bit tiny (they weren't originally intended as gallery space), the fact remains that thousands upon thousands of square meters of wall space have opened up to display even more of the Uffiizi's embarrassingly rich collection.

That said, the Grande Uffizi project is not quite finished yet.

Works are constantly being rearranged in order to free up some of the older rooms for their first (desperately needed) refurbishment in roughly 60–70 years.

You'll still get to see them. Just don't expect them necessarily to be in the same place it says on your map or in your guidebook.

Also know before you go that the Uffizi sometimes shuts down rooms for crowd-control reasons—especially in summer, when the bulk of the annual 1.5 million visitors stampedes the place.

Hit the gift shop early

For some reason buried deep in the idiocy of Italian bureaucracy, the museum gift shop actually closes before the museum does (around 6:30pm).

If you'll be staying until closing time and still want a commemorative museum book, postcard, poster, or whatever, pop in before your visit to the galleries or during the middle of your time there (or plan to stop by again on some other day just to visit the gift shop).

Useful Italian phrases

Useful Italian for sightseeing

English (inglese) Italian (italiano) Pro-nun-cee-YAY-shun
Where is?... Dov'é doh-VAY
...the museum il museo eel moo-ZAY-yo
...the church la chiesa lah key-YAY-zah
...the cathedral il duomo [or] la cattedrale eel DUO-mo [or] lah cah-the-DRAH-leh
     
When is it open? Quando é aperto? KWAN-doh ay ah-PAIR-toh
When does it close? Quando si chiude? KWAN-doh see key-YOU-day
Closed day giorno di riposo JOR-no dee ree-PO-zo
Weekdays (Mon-Sat) feriali fair-ee-YA-lee
Sunday & holidays festivi fe-STEE-vee
     
ticket biglietto beel-YET-toh
two adults due adulti DOO-way ah-DOOL-tee
one child un bambino oon bahm-BEE-no
one student uno studente OO-noh stu-DENT-ay
one senior un pensionato oon pen-see-yo-NAH-toh

Basic phrases in Italian

English (inglese) Italian (italiano) pro-nun-see-YAY-shun
thank you grazie GRAT-tzee-yay
please per favore pair fa-VOHR-ray
yes si see
no no no
Do you speak English? Parla Inglese? PAR-la een-GLAY-zay
I don't understand Non capisco non ka-PEESK-koh
I'm sorry Mi dispiace mee dees-pee-YAT-chay
How much is it? Quanto costa? KWAN-toh COST-ah
That's too much É troppo ay TROH-po
     
Good day Buon giorno bwohn JOUR-noh
Good evening Buona sera BWOH-nah SAIR-rah
Good night Buona notte BWOH-nah NOTE-tay
Goodbye Arrivederci ah-ree-vah-DAIR-chee
Excuse me (to get attention) Scusi SKOO-zee
Excuse me (to get past someone) Permesso pair-MEH-so
     
Where is? Dov'é doh-VAY
...the bathroom il bagno eel BHAN-yoh
...train station la ferroviaria lah fair-o-vee-YAR-ree-yah
to the right à destra ah DEH-strah
to the left à sinistra ah see-NEEST-trah
straight ahead avanti [or] diritto ah-VAHN-tee [or] dee-REE-toh
information informazione in-for-ma-tzee-OH-nay

Days, months, and other calendar items in Italian

English (inglese) Italian (italiano) Pro-nun-cee-YAY-shun
When is it open? Quando é aperto? KWAN-doh ay ah-PAIR-toh
When does it close? Quando si chiude? KWAN-doh see key-YOU-day
At what time... a che ora a kay O-rah
     
Yesterday ieri ee-YAIR-ee
Today oggi OH-jee
Tomorrow domani doh-MAHN-nee
Day after tomorrow dopo domani DOH-poh doh-MAHN-nee
     
a day un giorno oon je-YOR-no
Monday Lunedí loo-nay-DEE
Tuesday Martedí mar-tay-DEE
Wednesday Mercoledí mair-coh-lay-DEE
Thursday Giovedí jo-vay-DEE
Friday Venerdí ven-nair-DEE
Saturday Sabato SAH-baa-toh
Sunday Domenica doh-MEN-nee-ka
     
Mon-Sat Feriali fair-ee-YAHL-ee
Sun & holidays Festivi feh-STEE-vee
Daily Giornaliere joor-nahl-ee-YAIR-eh
     
a month una mese oon-ah MAY-zay
January gennaio jen-NAI-yo
February febbraio feh-BRI-yo
March marzo MAR-tzoh
April aprile ah-PREEL-ay
May maggio MAH-jee-oh
June giugno JEW-nyoh
July luglio LOO-lyoh
August agosto ah-GO-sto
September settembre set-TEM-bray
October ottobre oh-TOE-bray
November novembre no-VEM-bray
December dicembre de-CHEM-bray

Numbers in Italian

English (inglese) Italian (italiano) Pro-nun-cee-YAY-shun
1 uno OO-no
2 due DOO-way
3 tre tray
4 quattro KWAH-troh
5 cinque CHEEN-kway
6 sei say
7 sette SET-tay
8 otto OH-toh
9 nove NO-vay
10 dieci dee-YAY-chee
11 undici OON-dee-chee
12 dodici DOH-dee-chee
13 tredici TRAY-dee-chee
14 quattordici kwa-TOR-dee-chee
15 quindici KWEEN-dee-chee
16 sedici SAY-dee-chee
17 diciasette dee-chee-ya-SET-tay
18 diciotto dee-CHO-toh
19 diciannove dee-chee-ya-NO-vay
20 venti VENT-tee
21* vent'uno* vent-OO-no
22* venti due* VENT-tee DOO-way
23* venti tre* VENT-tee TRAY
30 trenta TRAYN-tah
40 quaranta kwa-RAHN-tah
50 cinquanta cheen-KWAN-tah
60 sessanta say-SAHN-tah
70 settanta seh-TAHN-tah
80 ottanta oh-TAHN-tah
90 novanta no-VAHN-tah
100 cento CHEN-toh
1,000 mille MEEL-lay
5,000 cinque milla CHEEN-kway MEEL-lah
10,000 dieci milla dee-YAY-chee MEEL-lah


* You can use this formula for all Italian ten-place numbers—so 31 is trent'uno, 32 is trenta due, 33 is trenta tre, etc. Note that—like uno (one), otto (eight) also starts with a vowel—all "-8" numbers are also abbreviated (vent'otto, trent'otto, etc.).