How to get around in the Chianti

Chianti country layout and the best ways to get around

The 168 sq. km (65 sq. miles) of Chianti Classico fill the area between Florence and Siena, sandwiched between the A1 autostrada and the SS2 highway.

You can explore the region on day trips from Florence and Siena, or stay around one of the "larger" Chianti towns (most no bigger than overgrown villages) such as Greve in Chianti, Castellina in Chianti, Radda in Chianti, or Gaiole in Chianti.

The famed Chiantigiana road (SR222) winds and weaves through the middle of Chianti.

(Boring but helpful note: Depending on how old a given sign is—though I think they've re-stickered most by now—this road may be marked as "SP222" or even "SS222"—over the past two decades, the 222's official designation went from a State Road [SS] to a Provincial Road [SP] to a Regional Road [SR].) 

You have two real choices for touring the region: Drive your own car (best for exploring, but someone has the be the designated driver), or join an organized tour from a nearby city (everyone can indulge, but itineraries are pre-set). Both are detailed below.

(OK, so you could visit the major towns by public bus, but be prepared to stay a while until the next ride comes along. The Public Transit links on this page can steer you to the right company to connect any two towns.) 

(Oh, and biking through the Chianti can be one of Tuscany’s most rewarding and scenic strenuous workouts. The region’s low mountains and stands of ancient forest are also excellent for hiking.)

 (Photo courtesy of AIGA)
By car
Chianti

The best option for bombing down back roads to isolated vineyards, castles, and medieval hamlets—but the driver cannot indulge in wine tastings

 

Bus tours and other specialty tours of the Chianti

 
★☆☆
Bike tours
Chianti

Guided bicycle tours of the Chianti

 
★☆☆

Hiring a private tour guide to tour the Chianti

 
Chianti tours
 
More tours
 
 
 

General tips of similar interest

Touring Club Italiano makes the best maps of Italy (Photo courtesy of the publisher)

A good road map of Italy can save you time and help you discover places and things not in your guidebook

 
 (Photo )

The interactive maps on ReidsItaly.com